IMPORTANT NOTICE

The built project was funded by the California’s Tobacco Tax Fund (Proposition 99) from 1999-2007, and in that time, developed numerous resources about cessation and prevention of tobacco use by construction and blue collar workers.  Many of these materials are still available in hard copy through the Tobacco Education Clearinghouse of California (TECC):  www.tobaccofreecatalog.org  (search for “union”).

We are pleased to have received funding from Pfizer to update the website and select materials.  Please contact us at [email protected] if you have any questions.



August 1, 2004

"...the body begins to heal"

Asbestos and lead are just two of the toxics used in construction that now must be removed. Careful abatement of these and other toxics can create a healthy building or worksite. Your body's health can also be restored by eliminating your exposure to the toxics in tobacco. The 2004 Surgeon General's Report emphasizes that quitting smoking has immediate health benefits. "Within minutes and hours after smokers inhale that last cigarette, their bodies begin a series of changes that continue for years."

In 20 minutes the heart rate will drop.

In 12 hours the carbon monoxide level in the blood drops to normal.

After 2 weeks lung function begins to improve.

After 1 month the coughing and shortness of breath decrease.

After 1 year the risk of heart attack is cut in half.

After 5 years the risk of stroke is the same as a nonsmoker.

After 10 years lung cancer risk is half that of a smoker. The risk of other cancers is greatly reduced.

After 15 years the risk of coronary heart disease is the same as a nonsmoker!

The Surgeon General reminds us that, "By quitting smoking today a smoker can have many healthier tomorrows." Focus on the good things that happen to your body and you can increase your ability to quit. To read the Surgeon General's Report see www.surgeongeneral.gov.

If you are ready to quit call
California Smokers Helpline
1-800-NO-BUTTS

Source: The Health Consequences of Smoking: A Report of the Surgeon General, 2004.